Mycoprotein is a unique and nutritious protein that can be part of a balanced diet and also supports the health of the planet.

It is high in protein, high in fiber, low in saturated fat, and contains no cholesterol. This meat-free protein contributes to a balanced plant-based eating style.

Fusarium Venenatum

Fusarium venenatum, the principal ingredient of mycoprotein is an ascomycota, one of the largest groups within the fungi family, which also includes truffles and morels. It is one of a genus of filamentous fungi, meaning it is comprised of a web of finely spun strands (hyphae).

Texture

Mycoprotein is made from natural, nutritious fungi from the soil. Once harvested, Quorn uses the age-old process of fermentation (much like that used to create beer and yogurt) to convert the carbohydrate into a mycoprotein dough, which takes on the texture of meat and can be used in a variety of culinary applications.


Resources

Did you know that the work to find this alternative protein source for humans began in the 1960s? Download the ‘What is Mycoprotein?’ fact sheet to read more and share with others.

What is Mycoprotein? PDF - 588KB

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FAQ - What is mycoprotein?

Mycoprotein is the ingredient common to all Quorn™ products. It is high in protein, high in fiber, low in saturated fat and contains no cholesterol.

Mycoprotein is made in fermenters similar to those found in a brewery. It’s made by adding oxygen, nitrogen, glucose and minerals to a fungus called fusarium venenatum.

These ingredients combine in the fermenter to form a continuous supply of mycoprotein which is harvested and dried before egg albumen is added to help with binding.

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FAQ - Is fusarium venenatum a mushroom?

No. Common mushrooms are one type of fungi, of which more than 60,000 species have so far been identified. Mycoprotein is made from a blend of minerals, glucose and another nutritious member of the fungi family called fusarium venenatum.

Fusarium venenatum is microscopic and very different in appearance from the fungi species one would buy in a greengrocer but it is unquestionably part of the fungi kingdom – a group of cellular plant organisms which lack chlorophyll.

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FAQ - Does mycoprotein contain mycotoxins?

No. The conditions under which mycoprotein is produced preclude the production of myco-toxins and every production batch is analysed using state of the art technology capable of detection at the ppb (parts per billion) level.

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FAQ - Is mycoprotein organic?

No. It’s not possible to guarantee to the organic status of all the ingredients used for mycoprotein.

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FAQ - Is mycoprotein vegan?

Mycoprotein is vegan. Some Quorn products contain a small amount of egg white and so are not vegan. An increasing number of Quorn products do not contain egg white and so are vegan. Please check the labelling.

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